APPLY NOW

Dual degree approach to storytelling

Roxanna Denise Stevens Ibarra is a double degree student at the College of Fine Arts. She graduated last spring with her BFA in Film and Television, and is now completing her second degree in Music Education as a violinist. As part of the 11% of Latinos, or 6% of Latinx that have a Bachelor’s degree in the U.S., she hopes to utilize her two degrees to convey storytelling visually and aurally, while embracing her Mexican and American cultures.

When Ibarra graduated high school, she was unsure of what major to declare and had an internal argument about money versus lifestyle.

“I realized that I rather be doing something I love instead of working away at something I’m good at but not enjoy,” she said. “As a result, I decided to go full force in that direction and pursued both degrees.”

At first glance, the two degrees may seem distant, however, they are very much interrelated. “In film you need music, and music isn’t limited to instruments,” Ibarra explained. “Instead, music can be a compilation of voices and soundscapes. When considering soundscapes, you have to consider the voices that are present and the ones that aren’t. It’s the same for music, in orchestral settings, it’s important to see what instruments are being included and excluded. It’s an active decision to include, or more important, exclude a voice.”

By understanding these soundscapes, music and film intertwine and become a synonymous idea. Ibarra blended the concepts successfully in her senior thesis film, Tesoro, which premiered at “I Dream in Widescreen” this past August.

>> I Dream in Widescreen: Q&A with Rising Stars

The film earned a nomination for ‘Best Drama Short’ at the 2020 International Motor Film Awards. Tesoro tells the story of an older man riding through South Tucson and through time, revisiting the memories of his youth as he prepares to sell his prized car.

As a member of the College of Fine Arts’ Diversity and Inclusion committee, Roxanna was moved by the Black Lives Matter movement and hopes for a better embracement of different identities, experiences and perspectives. “It’s such a problem when people talk about inclusion, whether that be Latinos, Latinas, black people, brown people, or foreign students, and not seeing those very same minorities in the educational facilities,” Roxanna said. “Being a part of the minority group that graduates at university level has brought to my attention that there needs to more accessibility. As a light-skinned, ‘white passing’ Latina, I consider myself very privileged, but there are others that are not. Because of that, we need to do better and start making recourses accessible to everyone.”

In October, Ibarra was awarded an Emerging Content Creators Scholarship to take part in the 2020 Latino Media Fest, which celebrates the best of Latinx content and content creators. “The Latino Media Fest exposed me to the amazing art in our community and really raised the question as to why we aren’t seeing more of these films in popular streaming platforms.”

Perhaps Ibarra and others will be part of a Latinx movement of new content on those platforms.

What advice does she have for students considering the ambitious dual-degree approach?

She stresses the importance of a schedule, when giving advice for prospective double-degree students. “I had to talk to both of my advisors and create a schedule before I even considered completing two degrees,” she said. “It’s not impossible, but don’t force yourself to complete it in four years. Many (might) think that it is a sign of success to graduate young, but what’s important is that you are doing what makes you happy without over-stressing yourself.”

Ibarra hopes to work for Disney in the future and would “love to create a soundscape or be a part of the composition teams for short films.” She dreams of working on a Disney princess film to contribute more female empowerment in the world.

 

 

 

Facebook Feed

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
2 days ago
Arizona Arts

UA School of Theatre, Film & Television students Haiden Pederson and Sofia Elena Gonzalez discuss the stressful process of baring your soul in #auditions and tips on how to deal with audition #anxiety.

azart.fyi/auditiontips

Images:
> Sofia in the UA Arizona Repertory Theatre’s production of ‘Pippin.’ Photo by Ed Flores.
> Haiden in ‘The Little Mermaid.’ Photo by Krimsin King.

University of Arizona: Acting/Musical Theatre
... See MoreSee Less

UA School of Theatre, Film & Television students Haiden Pederson and Sofia Elena Gonzalez discuss the stressful process of baring your soul in #auditions and tips on how to deal with audition #anxiety.

https://azart.fyi/auditiontips

Images:
> Sofia in the UA Arizona Repertory Theatre’s production of ‘Pippin.’ Photo by Ed Flores.
> Haiden in ‘The Little Mermaid.’ Photo by Krimsin King.

University of Arizona: Acting/Musical TheatreImage attachment

Comment on Facebook

Congratulations to Taylor Maresca for writing such a beautiful piece!

4 days ago
Arizona Arts

This past spring and summer Gyselle Cuevas served as a production assistant on the set of an independent film, thanks to support from the College of Fine Arts Medici Circle donors.

#MediciMondays

Gyselle is a junior majoring in Film and Television at the UA School of Theatre, Film & Television. She worked on the independent film, ‘The Long Walk of Carlos Guerrero,’ shot in Tucson, as a production assistant and assistant camera. She assisted with maintaining the camera, selecting the appropriate lenses and filters for each scene. She was responsible for slating each shot and generally supported the cast and crew through all stages of production.

The financial support provided through the Medici Award was used to cover travelling and living expenses.

The film tells the story of a man and young girl who get stranded in the desert of Southern Arizona. It was her first experience on a film set.

“I feel incredibly blessed to have worked with the cast and crew, and to feel like I was a significant part of something important and beautiful. I can’t help but express my gratitude to Sylvia and Herb Burton for this incredible opportunity. I am extremely grateful as this will impact my future as I seek opportunities as a Hispanic film student.”

Learn more about the program.
🔗 azart.fyi/MediciCircle

Thanks to donations made by the generous Medici Circle members, talented, artist scholars like Gyselle are awarded $1,000 to pursue an educational summer project beyond the classroom.
... See MoreSee Less

This past spring and summer Gyselle Cuevas served as a production assistant on the set of an independent film, thanks to support from the College of Fine Arts Medici Circle donors.

#MediciMondays 

Gyselle is a junior majoring in Film and Television at the UA School of Theatre, Film & Television. She worked on the independent film, ‘The Long Walk of Carlos Guerrero,’ shot in Tucson, as a production assistant and assistant camera. She assisted with maintaining the camera, selecting the appropriate lenses and filters for each scene. She was responsible for slating each shot and generally supported the cast and crew through all stages of production.
 
The financial support provided through the Medici Award was used to cover travelling and living expenses.

The film tells the story of a man and young girl who get stranded in the desert of Southern Arizona. It was her first experience on a film set.
 
“I feel incredibly blessed to have worked with the cast and crew, and to feel like I was a significant part of something important and beautiful. I can’t help but express my gratitude to Sylvia and Herb Burton for this incredible opportunity. I am extremely grateful as this will impact my future as I seek opportunities as a Hispanic film student.”

Learn more about the program.
🔗 https://azart.fyi/MediciCircle

Thanks to donations made by the generous Medici Circle members, talented, artist scholars like Gyselle are awarded $1,000 to pursue an educational summer project beyond the classroom.Image attachmentImage attachment
1 week ago
Arizona Arts

This spring feel, see, and hear live dance again with The University of Arizona School of Dance.

> Dance is in the Air
> Spring Collection
> Emerge: Student Spotlight

azart.fyi/DanceSpring22

“A highlight of the season will certainly be Frank Chavez’s Habaneros where we get to experience a taste of the vibrant Cuban culture,” said Interim Artistic Director Tammy Dyke Compton.

Images: Nate Mariano, Liana Corona by Ed Flores.
... See MoreSee Less

This spring feel, see, and hear live dance again with The University of Arizona School of Dance.

> Dance is in the Air
> Spring Collection
> Emerge: Student Spotlight

https://azart.fyi/DanceSpring22

“A highlight of the season will certainly be Frank Chavez’s Habaneros where we get to experience a taste of the vibrant Cuban culture,” said Interim Artistic Director Tammy Dyke Compton.

Images: Nate Mariano, Liana Corona by Ed Flores.Image attachment
Load more